Production is officially underway for Convicting a Murderer, a follow-up to Netflix's outrageously popular 2015 series Making a Murder. Deadline is reporting that the eight-episode docuseries will focus on the State of Wisconsin's controversial case against Steven Avery and his nephew, Brendan Dassey, for the 2005 murder of Teresa Halbach.

The new series — directed by documentary filmmaker Shawn Rech — is not a sequel to Making a Murderer but rather a follow-up Shawn and his longtime filmmaking partner, attorney Andrew Hale, financed independently. It is currently being shopped around.

"When Making A Murderer was produced, many on the law enforcement side of the story could not, or would not, participate in the series, which resulted in a one-sided analysis of the case," Shawn said in a statement. "This docuseries will examine the case and the allegations of police wrongdoing from a broader perspective. It will also share with viewers the traumatic effects of being found guilty and vilified in the court of public opinion."

steven avery netflix
Netflix

According to Entertainment Weekly, Shawn "got exclusive access to District Attorney Ken Kratz, lead investigator Tom Fassbender, and other primary figures in the case against Avery."

Meanwhile, Netflix is also producing a another season of Making a Murderer, which was announced at the beginning of 2017. That show, which will air on Netflix, will likely still focus on Steven and Brendan's ongoing case, though it's unclear when it will premiere. "The story is still ongoing, so you will see new episodes coming sometime this year as this story continues to unfold. We don’t know when for sure new episodes will be coming," Netflix VP of original content, Cindy Holland, told USA Today last January.

Steven is currently behind bars and recently opened up about his life in prison for the grisly 2005 murder of Teresa — a crime he still swears he didn't commit. "I'm going to be free," Steven, 55, told In Touch in an exclusive phone interview from Waupun Correctional Institution in 2016. "I'm 1,000 percent confident that I'll be free."