For the most part, Jinger Duggar and her husband, Jeremy Vuolo, have managed to steer clear of her famous family’s drama — and many even consider the duo to be their favorites. That said, Jeremy got into some hot water earlier this week after sharing a tweet about his views on suicide.

“Alan Redpath tells the story of a young woman who came to her pastor desperate and despondent. She said, ‘There is a man who says he loves me so much he will kill himself if I don’t marry him. What should I do?'” Jeremy tweeted. “‘Do nothing,’ he replied. ‘That man doesn’t love you; he loves himself. Such a threat isn’t love; it is pure selfishness.'”

Although some people praised the Counting On star for sharing Alan’s “beautiful wise words,” others criticized the 30-year-old for potentially encouraging people to ignore someone who is suicidal. “Get what you’re saying, but I think you need to be careful when you talk about ignoring suicidal people,” one person commented on the thread. Another added, “More like mental illness… in need of professional help. God calls people to be psychiatrists to help people just as much as he calls people to be ministers.”

Although Jeremy hasn’t revealed his plans for how he’ll spend Valentine’s Day with his leading lady, he’s clearly got love on the brain. Prior to posting the tweet above, Jer shared another Alan quote: “Many Christians seem to think of [love] only in terms of nice feelings, warm affection, romance, and desire. When we say, ‘I love you,’ we often mean, ‘I love me and I want you.’ That, of course, is the worst sort of selfishness, the very opposite of agapē love.”

Well, considering he surprised his pregnant wife with a candlelit dinner for her birthday, we can only imagine what he has up his sleeve for Feb. 14. A little advice though, Jer. You might want to refrain from talking about suicidal lovers that day. Just a thought.

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If you or someone you know is contemplating suicide, call the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1-800-273-8255.