Nothing is more horrifying to the families of a missing loved one than the idea that they may have been brutally murdered by a serial killer. That's the twisted image that Todd Kohlhepp put in the minds of people around the country in late 2017, when he said that he had many more victims than the seven he is serving life sentences for.

Todd was finally arrested in 2016 when a woman named Kala Brown was found chained up and tortured in a shipping container on his farm. However, his criminal career began long before that, way back in 1986, when he was just 15 years old. When his father was out of town, Todd stole his handgun, and used it to rape a 14-year-old neighbor at gunpoint in his home. He was actually sentenced to and served 15 years in prison for the crime and was released in 2001, when he was 30 years old. He seemed to be a reformed member of society. He got a degree in prison, and became a successful graphic designer and real estate agent. Unfortunately, something evil within him had been awakened.

todd kohlhepp, spartanburg county sheriff
Spartanburg County Sheriff

Less than two years later, Todd began his killing streak that would last until 2016. He began by murdering four people in a Superbike Motorsports store in Spartanburg County, South Carolina. In 2016, Kala's boyfriend Charles David Carter plus a local husband and wife were found buried on Todd's property, and he was also charged with the Superbike murders.

After being rescued from the container, Kala revealed everything Todd had told her. She said he had bragged about his murders almost totaling "three digits," meaning nearly 100 victims. In late 2017, in a letter to the local paper, Todd confirmed that he had more than seven victims, but didn't give names or locations. Anderson Police Department Capt. Mike Walters told the Herald-Journal that he doesn't think Todd was connected to any other local murders, but the killer had a pilot license and could have committed his slayings elsewhere and flown home.

Victims' families refuse to let their deaths be in vain. Two fathers of the victims have teamed up to try to fight for victims' rights, and to prevent Todd from selling "murderabilia" and making money of his gruesome crimes. Our hearts go out to them!

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